Things You Need To Do To Be Healthy!

1. Eat a healthy diet. 
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                                            Eating healthy isn’t always easy, but committing to a healthy diet can be one of the smartest decisions you ever make. Why? Not only can eating well make you look and feel better, it can also save you money on future health costs.
But even if you intend to “eat healthy,” knowing exactly what that means can be challenging. “Following a healthy diet includes choosing plenty of lean meats, eggs, vegetables, fruit, whole grain and dairy products,” says Debra Nessel, a registered dietitian with Torrance Memorial Medical Center in Torrance, California.
Eating well also means leaving out or only rarely consuming foods that are high in added sugar, saturated fat and sodium. That includes most fast food, full-calorie sodas, processed snacks like chips and crackers, and anything with more milligrams of sodium than there are calories in a serving.
If you need some help getting motivated, here are the top reasons to sneak a few more nutrient-packed foods into your diet.
Not everybody who is thin is healthy, and not everyone who is overweight is unhealthy, but eating right can improve health for even thin people who are junk food junkies. You can think of junk food as anything that’s high in calories and low in micronutrients like vitamins and minerals. This includes potato chips, greasy foods like french fries, and soda.
If you miss out on too much of the vitamins and minerals that your body needs, you could put yourself at risk for early death. A 2014 study published in the British Medical Journal found that eating at least five servings of fruit and vegetables per day was associated with lower risk of dying from any health-related cause
Get 6 to 10 servings of vegetables and fruits daily. (I prefer organic produce.) One easy way to achieve this is to prepare a smoothie with dark berries (often called “brain berries” for their beneficial effect on memory) from the freezer, “green” powders with vegetable grasses, spirulina, chlorella, and other protein sources, such as rice and pea protein powders, some kale or spinach, and some fresh orange juice or almond milk.
Lunch should include a salad, a vegetable soup and a piece of washed organic fruit. Dinner should incorporate vegetables known to promote health and reduce cancer risk such as the cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, brussel sprouts, cauliflower).
Spices are important with turmeric, cumin, sage, ginger, garlic, and hot peppers all having established medical benefits.  At all costs trans-fats and high fructose corn syrup should be banished. Alcohol and caffeine should be moderated. Green tea should be the stable drink along with filtered water.
  • Stay hydrated. This will help you reduce cravings and feel fuller.
  • Don’t skip meals. Eat at about the same time each day, if you can.
  • Get active. Just increasing activity a little bit may create a mindset to eat better too.
  • Preplan around cravings. If you always get hungry for salt at 3 p.m. or sugar after dinner, have a healthier alternative ready to go.
  • Forgive yourself when you slip up. Beating yourself up after a slip-up tends to unravel all of your goals; picking back up as though you didn’t make a misstep is a better option.

Keep in mind that good choices, like eating a healthy diet, happen one at a time. A few small changes in the right direction can help improve your life now, and they may fatten your wallet too.

2. Make fitness a priority. 
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Without question we have become a sedentary society and physicians are not immune. We often sit for prolonged times at work and conferences and work long hours. It is important however to make fitness a priority. Usually early mornings are the best time, as the day gets busy.
Exercise shouldn’t feel like a chore or something that has to be checked off your to do list. It should be a priority and an activity that fits into your daily routine, just like brushing your teeth or taking out the trash. However, kick-starting your workout regimen can be a challenge because there will always be some excuse or activity that gets in the way of taking care of yourself.
Whether you’re busy with carpool or working a 10-hour day, making exercise a priority is something that’s beneficial to you and your own body. There are countless times when we say we’re going to take up the latest bootcamp class or head out for a 3-mile run around the neighborhood. However most people don’t actually do it.
It’s easy to get distracted and even easier to give up if we’re not seeing results as fast as we would like. The thrill of starting something new and challenging can dissipate over time if you don’t stick with your plan.
If your mind is strong, then your body will follow. Don’t let excuses and the afternoon munchies stand in your way of that body you’ve always dreamed of.
Here are six ways to make exercise a priority.


We’re all guilty of throwing ourselves into some new fad workout; but then finding ourselves bored and itching for something new, again and again. It’s important to start slow with something that you know you like to do, such as running or even walking.

If you have free time in the afternoon, head out for a nice jog or a brisk walk with a friend. Make your physical activity a time to have good conversation. This can help entice you to continue with your routine because you won’t view it as something you have to do, but rather something you want to do. Working out with a friend will be something that you look forward to and who knows, maybe you’ll push each other to train for a local 10K or even ahalf-marathon.
Going from zero to 60 is never a solid way to start a new routine, mainly because you’ll burn yourself out quite fast. It’s important to set realistic and reasonable goals that you know you can accomplish. For example, “I will wake up every morning at 5 a.m. and run 2-miles” is most likely not a practical task for anyone; and you don’t want to feel guilty for not meeting your goal. A reasonable goal in sight is the way to go and you’re sure to not be disappointed.
Plan to exercise at a certain time each day so it becomes a part of your schedule. If you know at two pm you have your favorite Pilates class, or made plans to meet a friend for an afternoon jog, stick with it. Planning your workouts ahead of time allows you to have something to look forward to and, like stated above; having a reasonable goal is essential in accomplishing them.
If you don’t set up some sort of plan, it’s easy to back down and procrastinate. But who wants to back down on their health? Schedule your activity by putting it in your phone, writing it on your fridge or even having a friend bombard you with annoying text messages until you get yourself going. You’ll feel refreshed, invigorated and happy that you chose to dedicate an hour to yourself and health.

A home gym, if available, is a great option but I find a nearby fitness center with group classes motivating to get up early and see workout friends. A minimum workout of 30 minutes, 4 to 5 days a week is important. This should rotate cardio training, weight training, and flexibility such as yoga.
Stand as much as possible. Recent studies show chair time is life shortening. Standing and treadmill desks, like the one I use at home, help promote movement. Exercise can be broken into two sessions such as 20 minutes in the morning and 30 minutes at lunch time with the same benefit as if done all at once.
3. Get enough sleep. 
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Sleep plays a vital role in good health and well-being throughout your life. Getting enough quality sleep at the right times can help protect your mental health, physical health, quality of life, and safety.
The way you feel while you’re awake depends in part on what happens while you’re sleeping. During sleep, your body is working to support healthy brain function and maintain your physical health. In children and teens, sleep also helps support growth and development.
The damage from sleep deficiency can occur in an instant (such as a car crash), or it can harm you over time. For example, ongoing sleep deficiency can raise your risk for some chronic health problems. It also can affect how well you think, react, work, learn, and get along with others.

Healthy Brain Function and Emotional Well-Being

Sleep helps your brain work properly. While you’re sleeping, your brain is preparing for the next day. It’s forming new pathways to help you learn and remember information.
Studies show that a good night’s sleep improves learning. Whether you’re learning math, how to play the piano, how to perfect your golf swing, or how to drive a car, sleep helps enhance your learning and problem-solving skills. Sleep also helps you pay attention, make decisions, and be creative.
Studies also show that sleep deficiency alters activity in some parts of the brain. If you’re sleep deficient, you may have trouble making decisions, solving problems, controlling your emotions and behavior, and coping with change. Sleep deficiency also has been linked to depression, suicide, and risk-taking behavior.
Children and teens who are sleep deficient may have problems getting along with others. They may feel angry and impulsive, have mood swings, feel sad or depressed, or lack motivation. They also may have problems paying attention, and they may get lower grades and feel stressed.

Physical Health

Sleep plays an important role in your physical health. For example, sleep is involved in healing and repair of your heart and blood vessels. Ongoing sleep deficiency is linked to an increased risk of heart disease, kidney disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, andstroke.
Sleep deficiency also increases the risk of obesity. For example, one study of teenagers showed that with each hour of sleep lost, the odds of becoming obese went up. Sleep deficiency increases the risk of obesity in other age groups as well.
Sleep helps maintain a healthy balance of the hormones that make you feel hungry (ghrelin) or full (leptin). When you don’t get enough sleep, your level of ghrelin goes up and your level of leptin goes down. This makes you feel hungrier than when you’re well-rested.
Sleep also affects how your body reacts to insulin, the hormone that controls your blood glucose (sugar) level. Sleep deficiency results in a higher than normal blood sugar level, which may increase your risk for diabetes.
Sleep also supports healthy growth and development. Deep sleep triggers the body to release the hormone that promotes normal growth in children and teens. This hormone also boosts muscle mass and helps repair cells and tissues in children, teens, and adults. Sleep also plays a role in puberty and fertility.
Your immune system relies on sleep to stay healthy. This system defends your body against foreign or harmful substances. Ongoing sleep deficiency can change the way in which your immune system responds. For example, if you’re sleep deficient, you may have trouble fighting common infections.

Daytime Performance and Safety

Getting enough quality sleep at the right times helps you function well throughout the day. People who are sleep deficient are less productive at work and school. They take longer to finish tasks, have a slower reaction time, and make more mistakes.
After several nights of losing sleep—even a loss of just 1–2 hours per night—your ability to function suffers as if you haven’t slept at all for a day or two.
Lack of sleep also may lead to microsleep. Microsleep refers to brief moments of sleep that occur when you’re normally awake.
You can’t control microsleep, and you might not be aware of it. For example, have you ever driven somewhere and then not remembered part of the trip? If so, you may have experienced microsleep.
Even if you’re not driving, microsleep can affect how you function. If you’re listening to a lecture, for example, you might miss some of the information or feel like you don’t understand the point. In reality, though, you may have slept through part of the lecture and not been aware of it.
Some people aren’t aware of the risks of sleep deficiency. In fact, they may not even realize that they’re sleep deficient. Even with limited or poor-quality sleep, they may still think that they can function well.
For example, drowsy drivers may feel capable of driving. Yet, studies show that sleep deficiency harms your driving ability as much as, or more than, being drunk. It’s estimated that driver sleepiness is a factor in about 100,000 car accidents each year, resulting in about 1,500 deaths.
Drivers aren’t the only ones affected by sleep deficiency. It can affect people in all lines of work, including health care workers, pilots, students, lawyers, mechanics, and assembly line workers.
As a result, sleep deficiency is not only harmful on a personal level, but it also can cause large-scale damage. For example, sleep deficiency has played a role in human errors linked to tragic accidents, such as nuclear reactor meltdowns, grounding of large ships, and aviation accidents.
Perhaps the hardest aspect of good health is achieving at least 6 and preferably 8 hours of uninterrupted sleep at night. Poor sleep may come from sleep apnea, late night eating and computer and TV stimulation, a bedroom not sufficiently dark, or, of course, a noisy pager.  The health benefits of adequate sleep on mental function, weight control, and overall wellness are great.

4. Get supplements. 
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You Eat Crap a Standard American Diet

Grains, legumes, and most forms of modern dairy are not food.  The purpose of consuming food is to nourish the body and mind.  These foods do the opposite.
First of all, grains, legumes, and conventional dairy are nutrient deficient (or void).  They contain extremely small amounts of nutrients, most of which are malabsorbed.  Grains and legumes deplete nutrient stores and interfere with nutrient absorption.  They are toxins in themselves, which increases your nutrient needs.  Grains and legumes both cause intestinal damage which further decreases your ability to absorb nutrients.  Even if you’ve stopped eating these foods, you may be in nutrient debt or have lingering intestinal damage which is interfering with nutrient absorption.
Due to inflammation caused by other foods toxins, dairy protein is often inflammatory.  Conventional dairy also contains mycotoxins which are extremely damaging.

2. Soil Depletion

Improper farming practices deplete the soil of nutrients.  When plants are repeatedly grown on the same land, the soil loses nutrients faster than they can be replaced.  Over time, the plants have fewer nutrients to grow.  Fertilizer contains just enough nutrition for the plant to survive until harvesting, but not enough to support human health.  This results in plants that have 75% fewer micronutrients. (“Not On The Label“, p213.) In addition, most plants are not harvested fresh.  They sit on trucks, shelves, and counters for weeks before being eaten.  Over time, the nutrient content of these plants decreases.
Most modern fruits and vegetables are grown to increase their sugar content, not their nutrient value.  As a result, most of the common fruits and vegetables are artificially high in fructose and sugar and lower in key nutrients.
When plants contain fewer nutrients, the animals that eat these plants are also malnourished.  A study published in the Journal of Nutrition and Health found copper levels in the UK have dropped by 90% in dairy, 55% in meat, and 76% in vegetables.1

3. Water Depletion

Water is also depleted of minerals due to modern production methods.  There is a huge variation in the mineral content of bottled and tap water, with tap water generally having more.  Water filters remove important minerals such as magnesium, which was a main source of magnesium for early humans.  If you don’t use a filter and you don’t have a well, it’s likely you’re consuming dangerous amounts of fluoride and/or are deficient in magnesium.  This could explain why people who drink water higher in calcium than magnesium develop more myocardial infarcts and ischemic heart disease.

4. Low Calorie Diets Are Low Nutrient Diets

I know this is a crazy idea, but starving yourself is bad.  Consuming a low calorie diet means you’re consuming fewer total micronutrients.  Humans aredesigned to consume a large amount of calories, and it doesn’t make you fat.  When you eat less (as everyone says you should), it’s easy to become malnourished.  When you’re consuming low quality foods, you have to eat even more to obtain the right amounts of nutrition.  This is one more example of why food quality matters.
What do we mean by low calorie?  According to this study most diets require 27,575 calories to supply all the essential micronutrients.  If you’re eating less than that, and are following something like the USDA diet or the South Beach Diet, you’re deficient in nutrients.
Animal foods are generally higher in calories and nutrients, so it’s no surprisethat’s where the majority of calories came from in early human development.  Since the modern trend is to reduce the consumption of animal foods, people are consuming fewer nutrients.
Pesticide-treated vegetables are lower in phenolics than organic ones.  This is because polyphenols are produced as a defense against bugs and pathogens.  When there is no reason to defend themselves, the plant stops producing polyphenols.
There is pesticides. This is despite sometimes being contaminated anyway.  It should be mentioned that many studies show organic foods are not higher in nutrients.  However, that’s going by the USDA definition of organic – not “organic” that you would find in your back yard.  Fresh fruits and vegetables grown at home in well fertilized soil are going to be higher in nutrients than USDA organic versions.
Plants treated with pesticides are also lower in phenolics than organic ones.  This is because polyphenols are produced as a defense against bugs and pathogens.  When there is no reason to defend themselves, the plant stops producing polyphenols.
There is also evidence that glyphosate – RoundUp herbicide – chelates minerals in crops on which it is sprayed. It remains to be seen how much of an impact this effect has, but it’s safe to avoid GMO foods for a variety of other reasons.
Unfortunately, organic is not always possible due to financial or logistical reasons.  Even when you can find organic foods, they aren’t necessarily better.

6. Grain-fed Meat & Cooked/Conventional Dairy

Compared to grass-fed meat, grain-fed meat is abysmally low in antioxidants, micronutrients, fatty acids, minerals, and vitamins.  Grains are not a food for humans or herbivorous animals.  When herbivores are fed grains, they become malnourished, just like humans.  Grain-fed meat and farmed seafood can also serve as a carrier for more toxins, which increases nutrient needs.
Raw, unpasteurized, unprocessed, full-fat dairy can be good for you, but the kind most people buy at the grocery store is not healthy.  The majority of nutrients in milk are found in the fat (cream).  When you remove or reduce the fat, you are removing and reducing the nutrient content.  Pasteurization destroys some of the nutrients in both skim and full fat milk.  Conventional dairy is also high in aflatoxin and other mycotoxins that were in the cattle’s feed.
If you eat grain-fed meat or conventional dairy – supplementation is a good idea.

7. Toxin Exposure

Your body needs nutrients to deal with toxins.  When more toxins are present, you need more nutrients.  If you’re living in a cave or the garden of Eden, this will be less of a concern.  If you’re like the rest of us mortals – you’re exposed to a litany of toxins on a daily basis.
Here are just some of the things your body has to contend with:

    1. Xenoestrogens (plastics, BPA, some molds, petroleum products).
    2. Industrial solvents and cleaners.

Our bodies weren’t designed to deal with these toxins using only nutrition from food. They just weren’t. So if you plan to get your nutrition only from food, you should plan to get your toxins only from the Garden of Eden. Good luck with that.

  • Unnatural lighting.
  • Food toxins (not a problem if you’re eating Bulletproof).
  • Stress and lack of sleep.

There are hundreds of other sources of unnatural stress that increase the body’s need for proper nutrition.  Even if you’re doing everything right in terms of diet – it’s almost impossible to get all of your nutrients from food.
Our bodies weren’t designed to deal with these toxins using only nutrition from food. They just weren’t. So if you plan to get your nutrition only from food, you should plan to get your toxins only from the Garden of Eden. Good luck with that.

8. Nutrient Absorption Declines With Age

Several studies have shown kids need more nutrients to support growth, and older people need more nutrients due to malabsorption.  As people age, they often begin taking medications which can interfere with nutrient absorption.  This means you need to take more nutrients in the most absorbable form possible.

9. Exercise Increases Nutrient Needs

Athletes often think tons of exercise is the key to a long and healthy life (it’s not).  They are among the first to denounce supplementation as unnecessary, often with the idea that exercise is the best medicine.  I don’t advocate high amounts of exercise, but this is an important point.  If you’re doing enough exercise to substantially deplete energy reserves, you’re also using more nutrients for energy production and recovery.  As a result, athletes are at an even higher risk of nutrient deficiencies.  Since many athletes eat a low nutrient, high toxin diet – this is a serious concern.

10. Supplementation May Help You Live Longer

Aging is a natural process, but it’s not fun.  If there are supplements than can delay this process, why not take them?  As long as there isn’t an undue risk of harm, it’s hard to justify avoiding a substance simply because our ancestors didn’t have access to it.  There is good reason to believe a higher intake of nutrients may prolong life.  Our hunter-gatherer ancestors may have been malnourished at certain times which is not beneficial.  If supplements can buy you a few more years of quality life, why not take them?

11. Expense & Health

Whether we like it or not, sometimes supplements are cheaper than real food.  In the case of something like salmon, it may be better for you to supplement with a high quality fish or krill oil than to settle for a farmed variety.  Farmed salmon is low in omega-3s and high in toxins.
Farmed salmon are higher in parasites and bacteria.  In order to hide the sickly appearance of farmed salmon meat, the fish are fed a pink pigment to change their tissue color.  Farmed salmon contains 16 times more PCB’s and pesticides than wild.  Wild salmon is often more expensive than grass-fed beef, and presents more of a health risk than benefit.  Grass-fed beef has enough omega-3’s by itself, but supplementation may1 be a good idea for some people (like kids).
We live in a stressful, toxic world, and it’s a normal, healthy, optimized humanbehavior to understand the toxins and counteract them whenever possible. Hiding your head in Paleo-sand won’t make the effects of these toxins go away. Neither will eating some vegetables.
The idea that you can get all your nutrients from food is fine in theory, but virtually impossible in practice.  Soil and water depletion, food and environmental toxins, poor absorption, pesticides, exercise, and lack of calories can all cause nutrient deficiencies.  There is evidence that consuming nutrients from food is more beneficial than supplements, which is why you should focus on a nutrient rich diet first.  However, it’s rarely enough.
If you want to be Bulletproof, supplementation is a great start. Handicapping yourself by “only getting nutrients from food” is not a good idea, even on the Bulletproof Diet.

The modern American diet is calorie rich and nutrition poor. Much of this is processed foods and inadequate vegetables and fruits. Even for those choosing diets higher in nutrition dense foods such as vegetables and whole grains, the nutrients in soils in modern farming have dropped greatly and we are largely a country of overfed and undernourished people. Insist on natural based supplements.
Suggestions include:
  • Vitamin D3.  Vitamin D3 is not only important to bone healthy, but is a potent anti-inflammatory agent and is involved in brain function and cancer prevention. Blood levels should be checked (Vitamin D 25-OH) and most of us are low (usually below 30 ng/ml) and should be supplemented optimally to a level of 50-85 ng/ml.  Doses of 2,000-6,000 IU of daily supplementation may be necessary to reach these blood levels.
  • Probiotics. Our diets may be injurious to GI mucosa (dairy, gluten, alcohol, chemicals and pesticides). A leaky gut is now considered a factor in generation of diabetes, atherosclerosis and auto-immune diseases. Adding a probiotic of mixed flora is an easy addition and protection for the gut. Usually 10-20 billion colonies should be available in the daily probiotic supplement.
  • Resveratrol: This polyphenol found in wine has been shown to effect the sirtuin family of longevity genes positively and mimics calorie restriction, a proven way to extend life. It is not possible to get adequate amounts from a glass of wine so a daily supplement of trans-resveratrol, in the range of 100-250 mg, is a reasonable addition.
  • Omega 3 fatty acids: The data for the protective effects of omega 3 fatty acids on the vascular system and the brain are impressive. Good quality pharmaceutical grade supplements are available either from marine sources (salmon, sardine, krill) or plant based sources such as flaxseed, walnuts, and algae.
5. Don’t smoke. 
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I don’t need to say more.

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